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Soloing cutie with transparent dildo stretches her accurate crack

Duration: 24:46
Added 27-04-2019 Lucy
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Chapter 1 A mysterious disappearance Daniel woke up in the middle of a summer night, disoriented. He felt like an invisible hand had jerked him out of sleep. The bedroom was dark. With the leaden starlight from the window, every piece of furniture was like a crouching beast, cold and menacing. The night was really quiet. Daniel could hear a mouse running across the floor. His clock was ticking persistently. The wheezing of his chest sounded loud and ragged. He suddenly had this fear that his chest was empty and he was going to die. He wanted to call his father, but feared that his voice would shatter the peace of the night and everything would fall apart like broken glass. He got up, wrapped a blanket around himself, and walked to his father's room. The hallway was so cold. He could almost see his breath frozen into different shapes like ghosts hanging in the air. Every step he took towards his father's room, the air got colder and colder. It was like he was sliding into a deep cold pond. The door to his father's bedroom was ajar. He stood outside the door for a minute, feeling the darkness closing in on him. He had an eerie feeling that he was the only one in the house besides the mouse. He pushed the door slightly. It moved a bit-he waited-nothing happened. He pushed again until he could see his father's bed. It was empty. One corner of the bed sheet was flipped open, as if his father had just gotten out of the bed for some water in the middle of the night; but the room was too cold. Not a trace of human warmth was lingering in the air. "Dad-" he called. His own voice was so loud. It scared him. The sound was like blind birds bounding back and forth on the walls. When it finally died down, all he could hear was his breath again. He stood in the dark, searching frantically for someone that he could call for help. No name came up. It had always been just him and his father. He didn't think that they had any living relatives. If there were any, they certainly didn't bother to get re-acquainted with his family. "It must be a nightmare," thought Daniel. "I've got to wake up." He stood there waiting for the moment to come, but everything remained the same. He was still in his father's bedroom instead of his own. The cold in the air was palpable, and his feet were numb. He thought he might be better off going back to the bed. Maybe tomorrow morning, when he woke up, everything would be fine again. His bed was cold too, and it was really hard to fall asleep when all he could think about was what could have happened to his father. It didn't help that his feet were bothering him like bullies in school. He finally fell asleep when his mind wandered away to things like the latest video game or the last action movie. When Daniel woke up in the morning, he felt miserable. He had a vague felling that something bad had happened. He looked out of the window. It was a sunny morning. Sunny mornings like this always cheered him up, but this morning was different. It was like he just woke up from a nightmare. Although he could not remember anything, the sorrow was still there. Then something caught his eye. The plants on the sill were all dead. They were hardy plants like cactus and mums. They were now all dry and wrinkled, as if all the water was sucked out overnight. He suddenly remembered how cold he was last night, and his first reaction was to find his father. "Dad-" he called. He got up and ran out of his room, expecting to see his father downstairs making breakfast. The kitchen was quiet and empty. The morning sunlight came in from a window. He could see dust dancing in the sunlight. He thought that maybe his father was still in bed. He ran upstairs but stopped in the middle of the hallway. The memory came back new and fresh. Everything remained exactly as he remembered-the door was open, and the bed sheet was flipped. He started shivering. He ran downstairs and stayed in the sunlight in the kitchen-there was something about the sunlight that made the fear thaw. Daniel was glad that it was Sunday, and he didn't have to go to school. He didn't want to miss his dad if he came home. School had never been his favorite place. It was his third year in junior high. He didn't have any friends in school, nor was he one of the teachers' favorite students. He was small and skinny, and he always felt cold-even in summer. The other students liked to make fun of him because he always hid under layers of clothes. He did fairly well in most classes but never brilliantly. He had this feeling that he understood everything the teachers said, but he kept making silly mistakes on homework and exams. It was like he knew the lyrics of a song in his head, but they didn't come out quite right when he sang the song. Kids in school liked to show how pampered they were, and how prominent their families were. On those occasions, Daniel had nothing to say. His father was an accountant. They were not rich but not poor either. He didn't know much about his father. Even though there was only the two of them, they weren't exactly close. Rarely did his father show him any affection. It still bothered Daniel, but in a way he had gotten used to the relationship. He never had the courage to ask his father why their family wasn't like the other families. When he was younger, he had thought it was probably because he had done something wrong. He had tried his best to do things right-he made his bed every morning, cleaned his dishes after every meal, and even did his own laundry-but nothing really changed. Daniel could not remember his mother. The tiny bit of memories he could conjure seemed unreal. Sometimes, he wondered if he had invented them himself. He had this image in his head: he was swimming in a pond; sitting by the pond was his mother; a little further away, his father was jumping down from a rock with a beautiful flower in his hand; they were smiling at each other. He had been questioning himself since he was five. First the rock was really tall. It was impossible that anyone could jump down without hurting themselves. In the background was a mansion. The place was completely different from where he was living. The house that he lived in was just a small house like any other houses in a middle size town, where most people minded their own business and life was as plain as the suit his father wore everyday. Daniel turned on the TV and browsed through the channels. It was all morning news: somewhere in the world, a war was going on; there were earthquakes and hurricanes; but none of these really meant anything to him or caught his attention. He was trying to catch any sound from outside. His father could walk in any moment. He would tell him that he had to run to help an estranged friend after an emergency call, or he was out jogging, and what Daniel had experienced was just a very realistic nightmare. The morning sunlight and the background noise from the TV soon sent Daniel into his dreamland. This time he had a real nightmare. He was running in a dark forest. There was fog lingering in the air. He knew he was looking for something but didn't know exactly what he was looking for. At the same time, he knew he had to get out of the forest before something bad happened. He was running frantically but found himself in the same spot again and again, feeling more and more disappointed and desperate. Then he heard the doorbell ring. It was like a life-saving cord for someone about to be drowned. He grabbed it and felt himself dragged out of his nightmare. He lay on the couch for a while, trying to clear his mind and regain the senses. Then it suddenly came to him that it could be his father. He could have forgotten the key. Daniel jumped up and ran to the door. He was disappointed when he saw a stranger instead of his father standing at the door. The first impression he had about the person was that he was tall. He had to walk back so he could have a complete view of him. The suit that he had on was immaculate. The hems and the sleeves were so straight and crisp that they looked metallic. Daniel looked up and saw a very interesting face. It looked middle age. On a second look, Daniel found it to be much younger. There was not a single wrinkle on the face. There was, however, something very old about it. The person had a long and thin nose. His mouth was wide and firm. What interested Daniel most were his eyes. They were almost mesmerizing. One moment, they were fierce and looked right through you. The next moment, they picked up something interesting, and there was pure joy and fascination. "Yes?" said Daniel. "Hi, my name is Edmond Alverdine," said the person. "I'm a friend of your father's." His voice was deep and full of confidence. "He's not home," said Daniel. The visit seemed to like a bad omen. They rarely had any visitors. A visitor in the morning after his father had just disappeared certainly wasn't a good sign. "May I come in? I'm here to talk to you." Daniel felt a knot in his stomach. Alverdine seemed to already know that his father wasn't home. He was too scared to consider what it meant. He turned and walked back into the sitting room automatically. Alverdine walked into the sitting room and sat down on the couch. For a moment, the TV commercials seemed to really catch his attention. Then he turned to Daniel. "Come, sit down and tell me what happened," said Alverdine. He didn't sound worried or grave. "Are you a cop?" asked Daniel, feeling his fear ease a bit. If Alverdine didn't know exactly what had happened, then he probably didn't know where his father was either. That meant that his father could be safe somewhere neither of them knew of. "No, no, I doubt in this case the police would be of any help." "Er-why should I trust you?" asked Daniel. "Good question." Alverdine smiled at him. "Let me see-I have known you since you were born. Your birthday is April 29. And you are wearing a locket, aren't you?"

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